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The Scientist

» transcriptome and developmental biology

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Week in Review

Week in Review

By | March 15, 2013

Disgruntled Nobel loser sues; brain trauma researchers search for biomarker of a chronic condition; receptor for novel coronavirus found; the rise of transcriptomics; and ethical oversight of participant-led research

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image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Diverse Leaves May Protect Eucalyptus

Diverse Leaves May Protect Eucalyptus

By | February 20, 2013

A tree in Australia was found to have genetically dissimilar leaves that varied in attractiveness to herbivores.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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