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image: Fighting Viruses with RNAi

Fighting Viruses with RNAi

By | October 10, 2013

The long-debated issue of whether mammals can use RNA interference as an antiviral defense mechanism is finally put to rest.

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image: Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

By | October 10, 2013

Two papers on plant immunity have been retracted, and questions remain about others with similar results. 

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image: Building 3-D Microbial Communities

Building 3-D Microbial Communities

By | October 7, 2013

Researchers apply a 3-D printing technique to structure populations of bacteria in a three-dimensional environment.

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image: Trouble in the Heartland

Trouble in the Heartland

By | October 1, 2013

A new tick-borne disease has emerged in the US Midwest—and the culprit is not a bacterium. 

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image: Week in Review: September 23–27

Week in Review: September 23–27

By | September 27, 2013

Antibiotic cycling makes a comeback in the lab; how life scientists can learn from astronauts; napping to conquer fears; deconstructing the cancer R&D crisis

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image: Giving Antibiotic Cycling Another Shot

Giving Antibiotic Cycling Another Shot

By | September 25, 2013

Switching up the drugs used to treat bacterial infections could help clinicians battle both illness and resistance at the same time.

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image: New Organelle: The Tannosome

New Organelle: The Tannosome

By | September 23, 2013

Researchers identify a structure in plants responsible for the production of tannins.

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image: Week in Review: September 16–20

Week in Review: September 16–20

By | September 20, 2013

Dealing with anonymous misconduct allegations; efficiently generating iPSCs; distinguishing viral infections from non-viral; imaging tau in vivo

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image: Focus on the Host

Focus on the Host

By | September 18, 2013

A patient response-based gene expression signature can distinguish respiratory infections caused by viruses from those of bacterial or fungal origin.

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image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

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