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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Tension Tracker

Tension Tracker

By | March 1, 2014

For the first time, researchers quantify the mechanical forces cells exert on one another.

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image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.

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image: Making New Spinal Neurons

Making New Spinal Neurons

By | February 25, 2014

With a single gene, scientists reprogram supporting cells in the spines of living mice into new neurons.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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image: Triglyceride Clock

Triglyceride Clock

By | February 10, 2014

The timing of meals affects the levels of lipids in the livers of mice, according to a study.

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image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

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