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QIAGEN Ingenuity
QIAGEN Ingenuity

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image: Let’s Talk Human Engineering

Let’s Talk Human Engineering

By | December 3, 2015

Experts continue to discuss the logistics and ethical considerations of editing human genomes at a historic meeting in Washington, DC. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

3 Comments

image: Sneeze O'Clock

Sneeze O'Clock

By | December 1, 2015

Is a nasal circadian clock to blame for allergy symptoms flaring up in the morning?

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2015

December 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

By | November 25, 2015

Genetic engineering—once a trigger for federal oversight—is now ushering some modified crops around scrutiny.

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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

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