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image: Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

By | April 1, 2016

One man’s waste is another man’s treasure trove of stem cells.

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image: CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

By | March 10, 2016

A variation of the gene-editing technique can more precisely and efficiently downregulate the expression of target genes than traditional CRISPR/Cas9.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Mice Develop with Human Stem Cells

Mice Develop with Human Stem Cells

By | December 21, 2015

Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells participated normally in early mouse embryo development in a recent study.

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image: CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

By | December 21, 2015

California’s stem cell agency unveiled a 5-year plan that includes starting 50 new clinical trials.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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