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image: 23andMe Steps Back

23andMe Steps Back

By | December 6, 2013

The company announces that it will stop offering health interpretations of personal genetic data.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

1 Comment

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: An Open Invitation

An Open Invitation

By | December 1, 2013

On creating communal, equitable discourse to broaden participation in genetics research

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: Microbial Terroir

Microbial Terroir

By | November 26, 2013

Researchers show that microbes on the surface and stems of wine grapes are nonrandomly associated with the plant’s variety and geographic region.

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image: FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

By | November 26, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration blocks the marketing of unapproved genetic tests.  

9 Comments

image: GM Salmon Goes Commercial

GM Salmon Goes Commercial

By | November 26, 2013

Environment Canada allows production of genetically modified salmon eggs at commercial levels.

1 Comment

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