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» history, microbiology and immunology

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image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

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image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

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image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.

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image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

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image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper

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image: DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

By | November 11, 2014

Sequencing study reveals low levels of microbes in lab reagents that can create big problems for some microbiome studies.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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