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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

In 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: Interfering with Resistance

Interfering with Resistance

By | June 1, 2012

Drug efficacy and resistance mechanisms shine a light on how drugs enter cells, which could facilitate the development of new sleeping-sickness treatments. 

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image: Microbiology Goes High-Tech

Microbiology Goes High-Tech

By | June 1, 2012

Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.

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The Blood Exchange, Circa 1930

By | June 1, 2012

Early 20th century cross circulation experiments on dogs paved the way for milestones in human cardiac surgery.

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image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

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image: Mighty Moth Man

Mighty Moth Man

By | May 1, 2012

An evolutionary biologist’s posthumous publication restores the peppered moth to its iconic status as a textbook example of evolution.

22 Comments

image: SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences