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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

By | January 1, 2013

Founder, Chairman, and CEO, NeuroVigil, Age: 33

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image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

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image: Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

By | December 18, 2012

DNA samples and CT scans reveal that Ramesses III likely had his throat slashed by his son and other conspirators.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

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image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

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image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By , , and | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

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image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

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image: MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

By | December 5, 2012

Researchers identify microRNAs that keep cardiac cells healthy after heart attack, potentially paving the way for future heart regenerating therapies.

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