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image: Image of the Day: Gold Matter

Image of the Day: Gold Matter

By | June 30, 2017

The white matter tracts that wind throughout this microetching are based on diffusion spectrum imaging data from a human brain, realistically portraying the circuits found within a sagittal brain section.

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image: Memories Erased from Snail Neurons

Memories Erased from Snail Neurons

By | June 28, 2017

Scientists block particular enzymes to remove the cellular signatures associated with specific memory types.  

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The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

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The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium aims to characterize the entire mouse genome, starting first with more than 3,300 genes. 

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An analysis of human cancer genome projects uncovers a counterintuitive loss of ribosomal gene copies.

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image: How Roundworms Sleep

How Roundworms Sleep

By | June 22, 2017

When Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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By spreading a poison and hoarding the remedy, wtf4 improves its chances of being inherited. 

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Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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