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image: Sleep Circuit

Sleep Circuit

By | March 1, 2016

A web of cell types in one of the brain’s chief wake centers keeps animals up—but also puts them to sleep.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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image: Characterizing Sleep

Characterizing Sleep

By and | March 1, 2016

Sleep-like patterns of neural activity are apparent not just at the level of the whole brain, but also in isolated neural circuits.

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image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

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image: Sleep’s Kernel

Sleep’s Kernel

By and | March 1, 2016

Surprisingly small sections of brain, and even neuronal and glial networks in a dish, display many electrical indicators of sleep.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 

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image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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image: Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

By | February 1, 2016

Raphael Weldon’s critiques of Mendelian principles were 100 years ahead of his time.

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