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image: Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

Illustrating Alchemy, 18th Century

By | September 1, 2014

As the science of chemistry developed, public perceptions of alchemists shifted from respect to ridicule.

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image: Painting Pseudoscience

Painting Pseudoscience

By | September 1, 2014

Johns Hopkins University Chemist Larry Principe discusses his favorite alchemy painting, the topic of this month’s Foundations.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

By | August 21, 2014

Marine viruses may be key players in the death of massive algal blooms that emerge in the ocean, a study shows.

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image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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image: Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

By | August 1, 2014

Zoologist John Gould undertook a financially risky expedition to document the birds of Australia—and found some unique mammals in a perilous situation.

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

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