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The Scientist

» history, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

By | April 1, 2016

Now hailed as the father of immunotherapy, William Coley pioneered extraordinary methods to treat cancer.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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