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image: A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

By | March 1, 2013

A sharp-eyed fossil prospector and self-taught paleontologist, Mary Anning discovered several extraordinary Mesozoic marine reptiles.

2 Comments

image: The Rebirth of DIYbio

The Rebirth of DIYbio

By | March 1, 2013

Do-it-yourself science is likely as old as science itself, driven by an inherent curiosity about the world around us.

1 Comment

image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.

5 Comments

image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

4 Comments

image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

1 Comment

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

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image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.

0 Comments

image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

0 Comments

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