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image: Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

By | July 30, 2012

Like commensal gut organisms, skin microbiota appear to help the mammalian immune system mature and stay regulated.


image: The Mechanical Body

The Mechanical Body

By | July 26, 2012

“The body is a fascinating machine,” says Sandra Shefelbine, a biomechanics expert at Imperial College, London, in this 3-minute educational video by the Wellcome Trust illustrating the principles of muscle movement. “And we don’t understand most of


image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.


image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role


image: Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

By | June 25, 2012

Researchers should scour historic medical archives to discover knowledge that could inform today’s biomedical research and clinical practice.


image: The Fungus Among Us

The Fungus Among Us

By | June 11, 2012

Researchers find a slew of new fungal species inhabiting the human gut, and suggest a link to an inflammatory bowel disease.

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image: Parkinson's Vax Enters Clinical Trials

Parkinson's Vax Enters Clinical Trials

By | June 7, 2012

Researchers in Vienna are starting a Phase I trial on the first ever vaccine with a potential to treat the neurodegenerative disease.


image: Memory Tools for Plants

Memory Tools for Plants

By | June 4, 2012

How plants pass defenses to offspring through a complex molecular network


image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

In 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es


image: Avant-Garde Science

Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.


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