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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

8 Comments

image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

4 Comments

image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Peppered Moths Re-examined

Peppered Moths Re-examined

By | February 9, 2012

The textbook example of Darwinian evolution is tested and confirmed.

15 Comments

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

0 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: Is India Polio Free?

Is India Polio Free?

By | January 12, 2012

This week will mark the one-year anniversary of the last polio case in the second-most populous country.

6 Comments

image: Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

By | January 4, 2012

An adenovirus isolated from chimpanzee feces proves more effective than human adenoviruses as a vaccine vector for hepatitis C.

4 Comments

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