The Scientist

» history, culture and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

3 Comments

image: Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

By | November 1, 2016

This third excitatory network helps to regulate postinspiration.

0 Comments

image: Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

By | November 1, 2016

Barcodes of mRNA travel to the cells' axon terminals, offering a sequencing-based approach to neural mapping.

0 Comments

image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

0 Comments

image: Time, Flies

Time, Flies

By | November 1, 2016

By studying the sleep-wake cycle of fruit flies, Amita Sehgal is revealing how the body’s circadian and sleep rhythms are regulated.

0 Comments

image: Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

By | November 1, 2016

In the 1990s, the development of this gentler and more precise microscopy method improved scientists’ ability to probe neurons’ activity and anatomy.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

0 Comments

image: How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

By | October 27, 2016

Interneurons and mature granule cells in the adult mouse brain are critical for newborn neurons’ responses to novel environments.

1 Comment

In vivo imaging reveals how grafted embryonic brain cells grow, connect, and mature into contributing members of damaged visual pathways in adult mice.

0 Comments

As people continue to tell tall tales, fMRI data show certain brain regions become less busy.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
AAAS