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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: ESP on Trial

ESP on Trial

By | September 1, 2016

In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

By | September 1, 2016

From the gut and airways to the blood, muscle, and skin, diverse sensory receptors are doing unconventional things.

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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