Advertisement
NuAire
NuAire

The Scientist

» history, culture and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2012

The Aha! Moment, Imagine, Ignorance, and The Age of Insight

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Mara Crossing</em>

Book Excerpt from The Mara Crossing

By | June 1, 2012

Author Ruth Padel tells the stories of John James Audubon and cellular migration in prose and verse

1 Comment

Contributors

June 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

The Blood Exchange, Circa 1930

By | June 1, 2012

Early 20th century cross circulation experiments on dogs paved the way for milestones in human cardiac surgery.

1 Comment

image: Food's Afterlife

Food's Afterlife

By | May 25, 2012

Meals left to mold develop colors, mycelia, and beads of digested juices, sparking the eye of an artist, and the slight concern of a mycologist.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Bio-Art Winners

2012 Bio-Art Winners

By | May 25, 2012

Check out the 10 images that won FASEB's first annual Bio-Art competition.

0 Comments

image: Lab Bench Beauty

Lab Bench Beauty

By | May 25, 2012

Ten scientist-produced images take top honors in the first annual Bio-Art competition.

0 Comments

image: Misconduct on the Rise

Misconduct on the Rise

By | May 21, 2012

Retractions of scientific studies due to plagiarism, falsification, and other instances of researchers behaving badly have skyrocketed in the past decade.

8 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  2. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
  3. Four-legged Snake Fossil Found
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Advertisement