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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Redesigning Life</em>

Book Excerpt from Redesigning Life

By | December 1, 2016

In Chapter 8, author John Parrington explores the intersection of precision genome editing and stem cell technologies.

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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