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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

By | March 1, 2017

The principles of neuroplasticity may underlie the positive effects of music therapy in treating a diversity of diseases.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2017

Japanese health officials approve human experiments to treat macular degeneration with a cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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image: Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

By | February 1, 2017

The challenges of adapting drug development to the age of personalized therapies encourage collaboration among industry players.

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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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