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Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

By | November 1, 2013

Santiago Ramón y Cajal used a staining technique developed by Camillo Golgi to formulate the idea that the neuron is the basic unit of the nervous system.

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image: Ye Old Parasites

Ye Old Parasites

By | November 1, 2013

Evidence of early-13th-century intestinal worms found in a medieval castle latrine yields clues about the lives and deaths of crusaders.

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image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Academic Waste

Opinion: Academic Waste

By | October 17, 2013

From funding to publishing, academic research needlessly burns through time and money.

3 Comments

image: Bonding in the Lab

Bonding in the Lab

By | October 1, 2013

How to make your lab less like a factory and more like a family

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2013

Perv, Behind the Shock Machine, The Gaia Hypothesis, and Life at the Speed of Light

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2013

October 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.

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