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image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

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image: Mitochondrial Enzyme Detailed

Mitochondrial Enzyme Detailed

By | January 9, 2015

Researchers reveal clues regarding how an ancient mitochondrial enzyme helps maintain healthy cells across the tree of life.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Micro Masterpiece

Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition

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image: Rat Race

Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

By | January 1, 2015

Carl Linnaeus’s plant classification system was doomed, and he knew it.

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image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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