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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Week in Review: July 14–18

Week in Review: July 14–18

By | July 18, 2014

Converting heart muscle to pacemaker cells in pigs; alternative splicing and the human proteome; questioning a reported yogurt mold-illness link; H. pylori swiftly find mouse stomach injuries

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image: Books on the <em>Beagle</em>

Books on the Beagle

By | July 17, 2014

An online reconstruction makes the library from Darwin’s famed ship more accessible. 

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image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Imaging Intercourse, 1493

Imaging Intercourse, 1493

By | July 1, 2014

For centuries, scientists have been trying to understand the mechanics of human intercourse. MRI technology made it possible for them to get an inside view.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Interactome Analysis

Interactome Analysis

By | June 17, 2014

Study examines tissue-specific protein interactions linked to hereditary diseases.

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image: Beneficial Brew

Beneficial Brew

By | June 1, 2014

Drinking green tea appears to boost the activity of DNA repair enzymes.

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image: Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

By | June 1, 2014

The Green Revolution of the 20th century began with Norman Borlaug’s development of a short-statured, large-grained wheat.

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