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image: Breast Cancer Pioneer Dies

Breast Cancer Pioneer Dies

By | January 3, 2013

Elwood Jensen, whose research inspired new treatments for breast cancer, has passed away at age 92.

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image: Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

By | January 2, 2013

Despite decades of work, compounds in frog skins have failed to yield new antibiotics. Why?

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image: Bacterial Sacrifice

Bacterial Sacrifice

By | January 1, 2013

Patterns of cell death aid in the formation of beneficial wrinkles during the development of bacterial biofilms.

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image: Going Boldly Forth

Going Boldly Forth

By | January 1, 2013

Gregory Hannon believes in taking risks—an approach that’s enabled him to make exciting new discoveries in the world of small RNAs.

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image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

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image: Sperm Shadows

Sperm Shadows

By | January 1, 2013

Tracking the shadows cast by sperm reveals their precise 3-D movements.

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image: Evolution by Splicing

Evolution by Splicing

By | December 20, 2012

Comparing gene transcripts from different species reveals surprising splicing diversity.

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image: Bones Get in Her Eyes

Bones Get in Her Eyes

By | December 20, 2012

After undergoing untested cosmetic surgery that uses stem cells to rejuvenate skin, a woman grew bone fragments in the flesh around one of her eyes.

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image: Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

By | December 18, 2012

DNA samples and CT scans reveal that Ramesses III likely had his throat slashed by his son and other conspirators.

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image: Cancer More Diverse than Its Genetics

Cancer More Diverse than Its Genetics

By | December 13, 2012

Tumor cells can exhibit different behaviors despite being genetically indistinguishable.

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