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image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.


image: Critical Connections

Critical Connections

By | December 1, 2011

Through a series of sustained collaborations, Joshua Sanes has deciphered the molecular synergy that guides synapse formation.


image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.


image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42


image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 


image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.


image: Avoiding Animal Testing

Avoiding Animal Testing

By | December 1, 2011

Advances in cell-culture technologies are paving the way to the complete elimination of animals from the laboratory.


image: Brake Failure

Brake Failure

By | December 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Cell Biology


image: Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways

Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways

By | December 1, 2011

The tongue may be the epicenter of taste sensation, but taste receptors are scattered throughout the digestive and respiratory tracts.


image: Matters of Taste

Matters of Taste

By | December 1, 2011

Compounds we perceive as sweet or bitter in the mouth trigger similar receptors and signaling pathways elsewhere in the body, helping to regulate digestion, respiration, and other systems.


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