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PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» history and cell & molecular biology

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image: Our own 60 mutations

Our own 60 mutations

By | June 15, 2011

New estimates of human mutation suggest that each of us harbor approximately 60 novel genetic mutations.

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image: Ovarian cancer forces into new tissues

Ovarian cancer forces into new tissues

By | June 14, 2011

Ovarian tumor cells use cellular movement proteins to penetrate protective cell layers surrounding new target tissues during metastasis.

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image: First biological laser

First biological laser

By | June 14, 2011

Cells that produce laser light may one day zap cancer cells.

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image: Top 7 in molecular biology

Top 7 in molecular biology

By | June 14, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in molecular biology, from Faculty of 1000.

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image: Lobster-Pot Science

Lobster-Pot Science

By | June 13, 2011

Microbiologist Marvin Whiteley chats about teaming up with chemist and bioengineer Jason Shear in order to build tiny houses for bacteria.

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image: One Hip Dino

One Hip Dino

By | June 13, 2011

University College London researcher Mike Taylor recounts the discovery of a new dinosaur with unusually powerful thigh muscles. Read the full story.

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image: 2011 World Science Festival: A look back

2011 World Science Festival: A look back

By | June 10, 2011

The Scientist covered some of the events that made this year's festival memorable.

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image: Repairing hearts

Repairing hearts

By | June 9, 2011

Paul Riley of University College London discusses his new research, published June 8th in Nature.

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image: Apple peels give mice muscle power

Apple peels give mice muscle power

By | June 9, 2011

A waxy substance, ursolic acid, found in high concentrations in apple peels, can help mice build muscle and reduce muscle atrophy, body fat, blood sugar levels, and cholesterol, reports Newswise. 

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image: Repairing hearts

Repairing hearts

By | June 8, 2011

Upon activation, a novel population of resident cardiac cells forms new muscle after damage.

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