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image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42


image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 


image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.


image: Avoiding Animal Testing

Avoiding Animal Testing

By | December 1, 2011

Advances in cell-culture technologies are paving the way to the complete elimination of animals from the laboratory.


image: Brake Failure

Brake Failure

By | December 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Cell Biology


image: Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways

Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways

By | December 1, 2011

The tongue may be the epicenter of taste sensation, but taste receptors are scattered throughout the digestive and respiratory tracts.


image: Matters of Taste

Matters of Taste

By | December 1, 2011

Compounds we perceive as sweet or bitter in the mouth trigger similar receptors and signaling pathways elsewhere in the body, helping to regulate digestion, respiration, and other systems.


image: Human ES Cells Evolve in Culture

Human ES Cells Evolve in Culture

By | November 28, 2011

Researchers identify common genetic changes in cultured human embryonic stem cells, including one that confers a growth advantage.


image: How Skin Tells Time

How Skin Tells Time

By | November 9, 2011

The behavior of skin stem cells is regulated by a 24-hour circadian clock.


image: Q&A: Aging Geniuses

Q&A: Aging Geniuses

By | November 8, 2011

A new study shows that over the past century, the age at which scientists produce their most valuable work is increasing.


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