The Scientist

» history, developmental biology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

2 Comments

image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

0 Comments

image: Picturing Inheritance, 1916

Picturing Inheritance, 1916

By | May 1, 2016

This year marks the centennial of Calvin Bridges’s description of nondisjunction as proof that chromosomes are vehicles for inheritance.

0 Comments

image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

2 Comments

image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

0 Comments

image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

0 Comments

image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

0 Comments

image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

0 Comments

image: Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

By | April 1, 2016

Now hailed as the father of immunotherapy, William Coley pioneered extraordinary methods to treat cancer.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Antarctica Is Turning Green
  2. Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself
  3. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
  4. A Coral to Outlast Climate Change
AAAS