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» history and developmental biology

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image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

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image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Life on the Ocean Floor, 1977

Life on the Ocean Floor, 1977

By | September 1, 2012

The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift revealed a biological Garden of Eden.

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image: Bottom Dwellers

Bottom Dwellers

By | September 1, 2012

See some of the images brought up from early trips to the Galápagos Rift, where an ecosystem thrives around hydrothermal vents.

3 Comments

image: Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

By | August 1, 2012

Irving Geis’s revolutionary painting of sperm whale myoglobin illuminated the nascent field of protein structure.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: The Mechanical Body

The Mechanical Body

By | July 26, 2012

“The body is a fascinating machine,” says Sandra Shefelbine, a biomechanics expert at Imperial College, London, in this 3-minute educational video by the Wellcome Trust illustrating the principles of muscle movement. “And we don’t understand most of

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

By | June 25, 2012

Researchers should scour historic medical archives to discover knowledge that could inform today’s biomedical research and clinical practice.

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