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image: Ye Old Parasites

Ye Old Parasites

By | November 1, 2013

Evidence of early-13th-century intestinal worms found in a medieval castle latrine yields clues about the lives and deaths of crusaders.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.

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image: Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

By | September 1, 2013

In a cramped lab overflowing with fruit flies, Thomas Hunt Morgan and his protégés made the discoveries that laid the foundations of modern genetics.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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image: Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

By | June 26, 2013

A new book by an evolution historian asserts that Darwin and Wallace developed their theories of evolution independently.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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