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image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

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image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

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image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

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image: Lost Colony DNA

Lost Colony DNA

By | January 1, 2012

Genotyping could answer a centuries-old mystery about a vanished group of British settlers.

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image: Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

By | December 19, 2011

The Japanese Prime Minister brings a measure of closure to the accidents at the crippled nuclear power plant.

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image: Regulating Human Research

Regulating Human Research

By | December 15, 2011

A Presidential Commission suggests improvements to the US system for tracking federally funded research projects involving human subjects.

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image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

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image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

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