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image: Lost Colony DNA

Lost Colony DNA

By | January 1, 2012

Genotyping could answer a centuries-old mystery about a vanished group of British settlers.

94 Comments

image: Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

By | December 19, 2011

The Japanese Prime Minister brings a measure of closure to the accidents at the crippled nuclear power plant.

3 Comments

image: Regulating Human Research

Regulating Human Research

By | December 15, 2011

A Presidential Commission suggests improvements to the US system for tracking federally funded research projects involving human subjects.

0 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.

0 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Q&A: Aging Geniuses

Q&A: Aging Geniuses

By | November 8, 2011

A new study shows that over the past century, the age at which scientists produce their most valuable work is increasing.

39 Comments

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