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image: Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

Opinion: Text Mining Medicine

By | June 25, 2012

Researchers should scour historic medical archives to discover knowledge that could inform today’s biomedical research and clinical practice.

9 Comments

image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

In 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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The Blood Exchange, Circa 1930

By | June 1, 2012

Early 20th century cross circulation experiments on dogs paved the way for milestones in human cardiac surgery.

1 Comment

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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Mighty Moth Man

By | May 1, 2012

An evolutionary biologist’s posthumous publication restores the peppered moth to its iconic status as a textbook example of evolution.

11 Comments

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