Advertisement

The Scientist

» history and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

0 Comments

image: Medical Posters, circa 1920

Medical Posters, circa 1920

By | May 25, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. 

0 Comments

image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By | May 20, 2011

Two sisters -- a developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer -- team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life.

3 Comments

Skeleton Keys

By | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

By | April 1, 2011

Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, including a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, that interweaved practical medical knowledge with Buddhist traditions and local lore.

0 Comments

image: PET Guerrilla

PET Guerrilla

By | April 1, 2011

A former Uruguayan antigovernment rebel is developing a revolutionary diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s disease.

0 Comments

image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | April 1, 2011

Floral bouquets are the most ephemeral of presents. The puzzle of how flowers get their shape, however, is more enduring. 

0 Comments

image: The Footprints of Winter

The Footprints of Winter

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic marks laid down during the cold months of the year allow flowering in spring and summer.

0 Comments

image: Medicinal Alchemy, circa 1512

Medicinal Alchemy, circa 1512

By | March 1, 2011

During the Middle Ages, alchemists developed sophisticated ways to tap the medicinal powers of the Earth’s bounty. Liber de Arte Distillandi, published in 1512, is a layman’s guide to the preparation of these natural medicines.

0 Comments

image: Imprinting Diversity

Imprinting Diversity

By | March 1, 2011

Joachim Messing talks about how genomic imprinting may be a strong driver of diversity.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Mirus Bio
Mirus Bio
Advertisement
Life Technologies