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» history and developmental biology

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image: Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

By | August 11, 2011

A new microfluidics chip lets researchers analyze the nucleic acids of 300 individual cells simultaneously.

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image: Lab-Grown Sperm

Lab-Grown Sperm

By | August 4, 2011

Healthy mice are born from germ cell precursors grown in vitro.

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image: Baruj Benacerraf Dies

Baruj Benacerraf Dies

By | August 3, 2011

The Nobel Prize winner who discovered the gene that encodes the major histocompatibility complex passes away at age 90.

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In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.

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image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

By | August 1, 2011

A guide to free software for constructing and assessing species relationships

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image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

image: Repeated Regeneration

Repeated Regeneration

By | July 12, 2011

A 16-year-long newt study finds that regeneration remains efficient with repetition and age.

9 Comments

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