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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

By | January 1, 2017

Balto, Togo, and other huskies famously delivered life-saving serum to a remote Alaskan town in 1925—but newspapers didn’t tell the whole story. 

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

By | December 20, 2016

Reductions in the volume of gray matter in specific regions appear to represent synaptic pruning, a new study suggests, that tunes a mother’s brain to childcare.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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