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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

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image: New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2016

Imaging and manipulating the brain has come a long way from electrodes and the patch clamp, though such traditional tools remain essential.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Circadian-Controlled Thirst

Circadian-Controlled Thirst

By | September 28, 2016

Scientists determine how the brain’s central clock regulates drinking prior to sleep in rodents.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

By | September 25, 2016

But can $3 billion dollars meet the lofty goals of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative?

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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