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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Pharma Redo

Pharma Redo

By | January 1, 2017

Steve Braun of Cures Within Reach, a nonprofit focused on breathing new life into old medicines, describes the potential benefits of drug repurposing.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

By | January 1, 2017

Balto, Togo, and other huskies famously delivered life-saving serum to a remote Alaskan town in 1925—but newspapers didn’t tell the whole story. 

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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