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image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

It's a Cell-Eat-Cell World

By | August 1, 2011

For more than 100 years, pathologists have observed cancer cells engulfing other live cells, but scientists are only now beginning to understand how it happens and what it means for tumorigenesis.

21 Comments

image: Make Mine Rare

Make Mine Rare

By | August 1, 2011

With mounting interest from biotechs, Big Pharma, and the federal government, research on rare diseases is burgeoning.

6 Comments

image: Toads

Toads

By | August 1, 2011

Ascribing benefits to the experience of devastating illness or trauma is fraught with hidden dangers.

33 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

By | August 1, 2011

A guide to free software for constructing and assessing species relationships

0 Comments

image: Powering Clinical Trials

Powering Clinical Trials

By | August 1, 2011

To ensure high-quality clinical trials of a malaria vaccine, organizers in rural Africa must first upgrade electrical and research infrastructures.

9 Comments

image: Sharing the Bounty

Sharing the Bounty

By | August 1, 2011

Gut bacteria may be the missing piece that explains the connection between diet and cancer risk.

24 Comments

image: Stem Cells Hit Reverse

Stem Cells Hit Reverse

By | July 31, 2011

A transcription factor can make adult stem cells behave like fetal stem cells.

0 Comments

image: A Universal Flu Vaccine?

A Universal Flu Vaccine?

By | July 28, 2011

An antibody that binds 16 different flu viruses offers hope for the long-sought universal vaccine.

3 Comments

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