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image: Climate-Shaped <em>Arabidopsis</em> Genome

Climate-Shaped Arabidopsis Genome

By | October 6, 2011

Two genome-wide studies, backed up by field experiments, identify SNPs that correlate with Arabidopsis fitness in various climates.

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image: New Journal Ratings Questioned

New Journal Ratings Questioned

By | October 5, 2011

A new system of ranking scientific journals irks some metrics experts.

3 Comments

image: Makeup Enhances Likability

Makeup Enhances Likability

By | October 5, 2011

The first study of how cosmetics influence others' perceptions a woman’s personality suggests that makeup can make a difference.

6 Comments

image: Immunologists Take Home Nobel

Immunologists Take Home Nobel

By | October 3, 2011

The Nobel Assembly announced today that three researchers in the field of immunology will share the 2011 Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

45 Comments

image: <em>The Scientist,</em> Inaugural Issue, 1986

The Scientist, Inaugural Issue, 1986

By | October 1, 2011

Twenty-five years later, the magazine is still hitting many of the same key discussion points of science.

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In an essay entitled "Molecular Cut and Paste: The New Generation of Biological Tools," virologist William McEwan envisions a future where viruses are reprogrammed to become the workhorses of science and medicine.

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image: Early Warning Signs

Early Warning Signs

By | October 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Ecology

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image: Evolution, Tout de Suite

Evolution, Tout de Suite

By | October 1, 2011

Epigenetic perturbations could jump-start heritable variation.

9 Comments

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | October 1, 2011

The promise of viruses as biotech tools will help molecular biology fulfill its true potential.

6 Comments

image: Newly Discovered Species

Newly Discovered Species

By | October 1, 2011

Life on Earth is mind-bogglingly diverse with estimates of the number of existing species in the tens of millions. Over the last 4 billion years, many species have gone extinct; and because of the actions of humans, many existing species are now endangered.

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