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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: Scientific Publishing, 1665

Scientific Publishing, 1665

By | February 1, 2015

Henry Oldenburg founded Philosophical Transactions to share scholarly news from the “Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World.”

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

By | January 1, 2015

Carl Linnaeus’s plant classification system was doomed, and he knew it.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

By | December 5, 2014

Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.

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