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image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

4 Comments

image: Climate Conflict of Interest?

Climate Conflict of Interest?

By | February 24, 2012

Greenpeace flags researchers' payments from a climate change skeptic organization.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 21, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

image: Boozing for Better Health

Boozing for Better Health

By | February 16, 2012

Fruit flies consume alcohol to kill off parasites.

12 Comments

image: Fukushima Birds Affected

Fukushima Birds Affected

By | February 9, 2012

Radiation in Fukushima Prefecture is reducing bird populations less than 1 year since the nuclear disaster.

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image: Peppered Moths Re-examined

Peppered Moths Re-examined

By | February 9, 2012

The textbook example of Darwinian evolution is tested and confirmed.

15 Comments

image: Satellites Spy on Fish Farms

Satellites Spy on Fish Farms

By | February 8, 2012

Scientists use Google Earth to fact check official reports of fish farming in the Mediterranean.

15 Comments

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

0 Comments

image: Casting a Wide Eye

Casting a Wide Eye

By | February 1, 2012

Scientists study a variety of large-scale biological phenomena from the vantage point of space.

3 Comments

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