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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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image: Evolution in Oil Droplets

Evolution in Oil Droplets

By | December 9, 2014

For the first time, researchers have mimicked biological evolution using chemicals instead of living organisms.

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image: Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

By | December 5, 2014

Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.

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image: Royal Remains Confirmed

Royal Remains Confirmed

By | December 3, 2014

Bones unearthed in 2012 are likely those of King Richard III, a new DNA analysis shows.

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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

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image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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