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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

By | January 1, 2017

Balto, Togo, and other huskies famously delivered life-saving serum to a remote Alaskan town in 1925—but newspapers didn’t tell the whole story. 

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

By | November 1, 2016

In the 1990s, the development of this gentler and more precise microscopy method improved scientists’ ability to probe neurons’ activity and anatomy.

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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

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image: ESP on Trial

ESP on Trial

By | September 1, 2016

In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

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