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image: Water Fleas, 1755

Water Fleas, 1755

By | June 1, 2015

A German naturalist trains a keen eye and a microscope on a tiny crustacean to unlock its secrets.

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image: Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

By | April 1, 2015

Alfred Donné’s microscopic daguerreotypes described the cellular symptoms of leukemia for the first time.

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image: <em>Apiarium</em>, 1625

Apiarium, 1625

By | March 1, 2015

Galileo’s improvements to the microscope led to the first published observations using such an instrument.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: Scientific Publishing, 1665

Scientific Publishing, 1665

By | February 1, 2015

Henry Oldenburg founded Philosophical Transactions to share scholarly news from the “Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World.”

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

The Sex Parts of Plants, 1736

By | January 1, 2015

Carl Linnaeus’s plant classification system was doomed, and he knew it.

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image: Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

By | December 5, 2014

Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.

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image: Royal Remains Confirmed

Royal Remains Confirmed

By | December 3, 2014

Bones unearthed in 2012 are likely those of King Richard III, a new DNA analysis shows.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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