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image: Peppered Moths Re-examined

Peppered Moths Re-examined

By | February 9, 2012

The textbook example of Darwinian evolution is tested and confirmed.

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image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

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image: Lost Colony DNA

Lost Colony DNA

By | January 1, 2012

Genotyping could answer a centuries-old mystery about a vanished group of British settlers.

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image: Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

Japan Declares Fukushima Stable

By | December 19, 2011

The Japanese Prime Minister brings a measure of closure to the accidents at the crippled nuclear power plant.

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image: Regulating Human Research

Regulating Human Research

By | December 15, 2011

A Presidential Commission suggests improvements to the US system for tracking federally funded research projects involving human subjects.

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image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.

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image: Q&A: Aging Geniuses

Q&A: Aging Geniuses

By | November 8, 2011

A new study shows that over the past century, the age at which scientists produce their most valuable work is increasing.

39 Comments

image: Mummy Cancer

Mummy Cancer

By | October 28, 2011

Researchers diagnose the second oldest known case of prostate cancer in a two-thousand-year-old-Egyptian mummy.

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