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image: Religion and Disease

Religion and Disease

By | August 25, 2011

Deadly epidemics can have a profound impact on people’s choice of religion.

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image: Baruj Benacerraf Dies

Baruj Benacerraf Dies

By | August 3, 2011

The Nobel Prize winner who discovered the gene that encodes the major histocompatibility complex passes away at age 90.

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In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.

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image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

By | August 1, 2011

A guide to free software for constructing and assessing species relationships

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image: A Scar Nobly Got

A Scar Nobly Got

By | July 1, 2011

The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2011

Solar, The Dark X, The Sky's Dark Labyrinth, Spiral

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image: Book excerpt from <em>Pox: An American History</em>

Book excerpt from Pox: An American History

By | July 1, 2011

In Chapter 5, "The Stable and the Laboratory," author Michael Willrich explores the burgeoning vaccine manufacture industry that ramped up to combat smallpox epidemics in turn-of-the-twentieth-century American cities.

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image: Scientist to Watch

Scientist to Watch

By | July 1, 2011

“This is my trophy,” says biologist Michael Edidin, walking across his office at Johns Hopkins University to pick up two oversized clock hands, once part of the stately clock tower that still stands on the Baltimore campus. 

3 Comments

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