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image: A Quarter Century of Fueling Science

A Quarter Century of Fueling Science

By | October 1, 2011

History repeats itself, and so do trends in research funding.

12 Comments

image: Alive and Kicking

Alive and Kicking

By | October 1, 2011

The publication I launched a quarter century ago has come further than anyone ever expected.

27 Comments

image: Data Deluge

Data Deluge

By | October 1, 2011

Large-scale data collection and analysis have fundamentally altered the process and mind-set of biological research.

15 Comments

image: Research and Development Funding, By the Numbers

Research and Development Funding, By the Numbers

By | October 1, 2011

Government and industry are the biggest funders of research, basic and otherwise. Here is how science funding in the US and European Union has shaped up in the past two and a half decades. 

0 Comments

image: Animal Electricity, circa 1781

Animal Electricity, circa 1781

By | September 28, 2011

How an Italian scientist doing Frankenstein-like experiments on dead frogs discovered that the body is powered by electrical impulses.

3 Comments

image: Religion and Disease

Religion and Disease

By | August 25, 2011

Deadly epidemics can have a profound impact on people’s choice of religion.

18 Comments

image: Baruj Benacerraf Dies

Baruj Benacerraf Dies

By | August 3, 2011

The Nobel Prize winner who discovered the gene that encodes the major histocompatibility complex passes away at age 90.

0 Comments

In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.

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image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

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