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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

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image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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image: Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

Study: Genetic Tests Don’t Change Behavior

By | March 17, 2016

Knowing one’s genetic risk for particular diseases doesn’t encourage behavior modifications, according to a study.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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