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Pounding Out A Victory Walgren Dumped, Brown Survives Both Sides Now Carrying On A Tradition Full-Speed Ahead At OSTP The residents of California's San Diego County have voted by a 2-to-1 margin to continue to allow unclaimed pound animals to be used in medical research. More than 600,000 voters cast ballots November 6 in the largest-ever electoral rebuff of the animal rights movement's efforts to curb the use of pound animals in research. Supporters spent $130,000 to campaign for the r

December 10, 1990

  • Pounding Out A Victory
  • Walgren Dumped, Brown Survives
  • Both Sides Now
  • Carrying On A Tradition
  • Full-Speed Ahead At OSTP
  • The residents of California's San Diego County have voted by a 2-to-1 margin to continue to allow unclaimed pound animals to be used in medical research. More than 600,000 voters cast ballots November 6 in the largest-ever electoral rebuff of the animal rights movement's efforts to curb the use of pound animals in research. Supporters spent $130,000 to campaign for the referendum, which was drafted by county legislators and endorsed by such well-known scientific figures as former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and Nobel laureate George Palade. There have been six such referenda--four in California--on the issue since 1986, says Barbara Rich of the Washington, D.C.-based National Association for Biomedical Research, and all have passed by similarly large margins.

    here on Election Day, an active supporter in Congress of more federal funding for science was upset by a political novice and a second strong voice for science won a narrow victory. Rep. Doug Walgren (D-Pa.), former chairman of the House science research subcommittee, was beaten by Rick Santorum, a 32-year-old lawyer, in his bid for an eighth term. And the man rumored to be the next chairman of the House science committee, Rep. George Brown (D-Calif.), survived a close race to win a 10th consecutive term. The current science chairman, Rep. Robert Roe (D-N.J.), who won reelection easily, is said to be weighing a bid for chairman of the Public Works Committee.

    Academic exchanges work best when each side has something the other side wants. That's the idea behind the Russian American University Consortium, a new group formed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., and the National Science Teachers Association in Washington, D.C. "The key is complementary skills," says NSTA's executive director Bill Aldridge about the program, which would send U.S. faculty in economics, computer science, and business to teach Russian students, while Soviet professors of Slavic languages and certain branches of theoretical science come to various U.S. institutions. This fall, Ed Dolan, an economist, arrived at Moscow State University to teach 80 Russian engineers and computer scientists about the free enterprise system in the first wave of a program that Aldridge hopes some day will involve two dozen U.S. campuses and a proposed building at Moscow State.

    A young people's Christmas lecture on science, started in 19th-century Great Britain by the renowned Michael Faraday and revived 20 years ago in the U.S. by University of Wisconsin chemist and former NSF education director Bassam Shakhashiri, is making its national television debut this month with Nobel laureate physicist Leon Lederman. The Learning Channel, a cable television station in Reston, Va., has taped Lederman, the former director of Fermilab, in a discussion with teenagers about subatomic particles known as quarks. Next year's lecture will showcase noted Harvard University entomologist Edward Wilson. "Physics looked like more fun than chemistry and didn't smell as bad," Lederman will tell his audience in an informal talk about science and his life as a scientist.

    As the second year of the Bush presidency comes to a close, science adviser Allan Bromley says his Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is just hitting its stride. Congress has added $260,000 to its 1991 request of $3.3 million, allowing Bromley to computerize the office and hire additional staff to keep up with an increasing demand from Congress for reports on a variety of topics. And Bromley has recruited Donald Henderson, who just retired after 14 years as dean of the School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, to serve as consultant to the Life Sciences program. The 62-year-old Henderson, who previously worked on smallpox eradication for the World Health Organization, is also chairman of a committee advising the federal government on a national vaccine strategy.


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