How Scientists Get Their News

The Scientist surveyed 485 readers to find out how they keep up with the (nonscientific) news. More than 98% of readers stay abreast of current events, and more than 70% use three or more media. Most popular is television news, with 71.1% watching regularly, closely followed by news Web sites (68.8%). Daily newspapers and Sunday newspapers follow with 57.2% and 47.9%, respectively. About 2% admit to not keeping up with the news. CNN is the overwhelming favorite among the more than 70 TV channel

By | February 24, 2003

The Scientist surveyed 485 readers to find out how they keep up with the (nonscientific) news. More than 98% of readers stay abreast of current events, and more than 70% use three or more media. Most popular is television news, with 71.1% watching regularly, closely followed by news Web sites (68.8%). Daily newspapers and Sunday newspapers follow with 57.2% and 47.9%, respectively. About 2% admit to not keeping up with the news. CNN is the overwhelming favorite among the more than 70 TV channels mentioned--it is watched by 21% of television viewers. By far the most popular newspaper of the 148 mentioned is The New York Times, read by 16% of newspaper readers.

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS