Married to Science

Snapshot | Married to Science  Click for larger version (40K) And some even like it Of the 308 surveyed readers of The Scientist who are married or in long-term relationships, 36% have scientists as partners, 8% working together in the lab. More than 100 respondents commented on such an arrangement--most are enthusiastic, or at least content with their lot. Most who work with their scientist partners extol the benefits of cooperation and mutual understanding. Said one: "

By | April 7, 2003

Snapshot | Married to Science


And some even like it

Of the 308 surveyed readers of The Scientist who are married or in long-term relationships, 36% have scientists as partners, 8% working together in the lab.

More than 100 respondents commented on such an arrangement--most are enthusiastic, or at least content with their lot. Most who work with their scientist partners extol the benefits of cooperation and mutual understanding. Said one: "It's great to have a critical thinker around, even if she is molecular-biology challenged."

Others warn of the dangers of professional competition. It's "intellectually incestuous," said a reader. "Usually one is dominant over the other," said another. Of those scientists whose life mates are not in the same profession, they primarily have chosen teachers, artists, and nurses as their partners.

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