The Sporting Scientist

Snapshot | The Sporting Scientist Outside of the lab, everything's game Scientists crave that endorphin rush: 85% of the 312 respondents to our recent survey say they actively participate in sports or athletic activities more than once per month -- 53% get into a sweat more than once per week. Nearly 30% participate in team sports, with soccer the most popular pick; 29% participate in competitive sports, with tennis the game of choice; and a hearty 82% participate noncompetitively in athlet

By | September 22, 2003

Snapshot | The Sporting Scientist

Outside of the lab, everything's game

Scientists crave that endorphin rush: 85% of the 312 respondents to our recent survey say they actively participate in sports or athletic activities more than once per month -- 53% get into a sweat more than once per week.

Nearly 30% participate in team sports, with soccer the most popular pick; 29% participate in competitive sports, with tennis the game of choice; and a hearty 82% participate noncompetitively in athletic activities such as running and swimming. The majority, 77%, attend sports matches or watch them on TV; the top three choices are American football, soccer, and basketball.

Our readers get into the act for all types of reasons: to get away from science, feel healthy, be competitive. "Sports are the only means of revival," says one. And more, says another. "I do some of my best, insightful thinking while climbing, running, hiking."

Others, however, haven't the time in their day to get out and play. "I used to bike. Then I had kids," laments one. Another empathizes: "My participation in sports lies primarily in schlepping my three sons to their respective team sports."

--Alexander Grimwade


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